We Treat Feet Podiatry Blog

We Treat Feet Offers Plasma Rich Therapy at 65% Discount!

We’ve been seeing reports of late stating Plasma Rich Therapy costs between $500-1000 – this seems like an awful lot to us as our rate for PRP Therapy (without insurance!) is only $300! So if you’ve been considering this restorative therapy give us a call and take advantage of our professional team and unbeatable prices! You can reach us by phone at 410-363-4343 or Schedule An Appointment Online!.
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What is driving a physician shortage and how can it be stopped?

As its name insists, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is supposed to give more American access to reasonably-price healthcare, but this affordability would prove fruitless if the number of primary care physicians in the United States continues to decrease. Recent findings from the likes of SERMO, the largest online community of physicians, show that amongst all provider specialties family and internal medicine are two of three unhappiest groups of physicians, 62 percent and 60 percent, respectively. Only obstetricians and gynecologists come in lower at 59 percent. For internists and family physicians, dissatisfaction with lifestyle was a common factor leading many to rethink their choice of specialty, 25 and 23 percent, respectively. “These are the doctors on the front lines in medicine who are seeing the increase pressure and in particular now with the ACA in play and a higher stream of patients coming in,” SERMO CEO Peter Kirk tells EHRIntelligence.com..
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APMA Advocates for Permanent Medicare Payment Reform

WASHINGTON—The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) today voiced its concern over the short-term solution known as the “doc fix” legislation passed by voice vote in the House of Representatives. APMA calls on Congress to discontinue use of these temporary fixes, and instead focus efforts on continuing bipartisan negotiations, working toward a permanent SGR replacement package that includes provisions of the APMA-sponsored HELLPP Act. The one-year “doc fix” keeps Medicare payment levels at their current level and averts the 24-percent payment cut scheduled to take effect April 1. Instead, providers would see a 0.5-percent increase in payments through December 31, 2014. Payments would then revert to their current levels through April 15, 2015. The bill would also delay the ICD-10 transition until October 2015. While the delay does allow for additional time for preparation, it poses a significant financial and resource impact on entities that were heavily invested in the transition..
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New Children’s Foot Health Campaign Kicks Off

April’s foot health awareness month provides APMA the opportunity to educate the general public about the importance of maintaining children’s foot health at all stages of development, and the role today’s podiatrist plays in promoting positive foot health. This year’s campaign, titled “First Steps: Keeping Kids’ Feet Happy and Healthy”, will provide members with a host of new educational materials, including an online resource page, poster, customizable newsletter, kid-friendly worksheet, and shareable multimedia. A dedicated media relations strategy targeting “mommy bloggers” will also take place throughout the month, positioning APMA members as experts in the realm of children’s foot health. The “First Steps” campaign kicks off April 1, and resources will remain on APMA.org for a full year after the campaign’s completion for members’ use. For any questions, or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact the APMA Communications department..
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Fashionable Footwear – Good for Style, Bad for Foot Health

More than half of Americans suffer from foot problems, and often those problems are directly related to shoes. But no matter how cute a shoe looks, Orly Avitzur, medical adviser at Consumer Reports, said that having fashionable footwear isn’t worth the health risks. “Wearing the wrong shoes can lead to lifelong deformities that require surgery to fix,” she said. According to a new study from the Institute for Preventive Foot Health, uncomfortable and ill-fitting shoes are a serious problem. Shoes that force feet into narrow or pointy toes can cause bunions or hammertoes, where the toes curl unnaturally downward. But that doesn’t stop women like Trisha Calvo and Jennifer Frost from wearing name brand heels. “I feel fabulous in them,” Frost said. “You feel fabulous in your shoes…not physically fabulous in them.” Studies show that high heels can shorten your Achilles tendon and can trigger planter fasciitis, an inflammation in.
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7 Tips to Take Care of Your Feet This Winter!

Winter’s chill makes it easy to forget about taking care of your feet – but it’s still vitally important! Here are 7 great tips from our friends at Houston’s Diagnostic Foot Specialists that can help stay healthy through the coldest months of the year: Keep Them Clean To avoid getting an ingrown toenail, fungus or other unpleasant things on your feet, make sure that you take the time to wash them thoroughly every day. Regular soap and water should work fine, or your foot doctor can give you a few tips about what to use. After washing your feet, take the time to dry them thoroughly before putting on your socks or shoes. It is also a good idea to soak your feet every now and then, particularly if you are suffering from heel pain or general discomfort. Epsom salt and warm water works well for soaking your feet and.
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8 Great Suggestions for Diabetic Foot Care

1.) Maintain a blood sugar level of 70 to 130 mg/dL before your meals and less than 180 mg/dL two hours after you’ve started your meal, with a haemoglobin A1C level that is less than 7 percent. This can be achieved through regular exercise, monitoring how often and what you are eating, keeping up with medications prescribed by your doctor, and monitoring your blood sugar as often as is necessary for optimal control. 2.) Never walk barefooted. Seashells, glass, or other ocean debris can cut your skin and cause serious infections without you realizing it. Walking barefoot on a hot pavement or hot sand can also lead to severe burns or infections. Avoid wearing sandals, as sand and other foreign bodies can still get into the sandal. Podiatrist, Cyaandi Dove, advises all her diabetic patients to choose closed shoes over flip-flops and sandals to give their feet maximum protect. She.
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What’s at stake if Congress repeals the Medical Device Tax?

During the battle to reopen the government, a pot With that in mind, here are some frequently asked questions about the tax. Q: What is the medical device tax? A: Since the beginning of this year, medical device manufacturers and importers have paid a 2.3 percent tax on the sale of any taxable medical device. The tax applies to devices like artificial hips or pacemakers, not to devices sold over-the-the counter, like eyeglasses or contact lenses. Q: Why did Congress put the tax into the health law? A: The law created a package of new taxes and fees to finance the cost of the health law’s subsidies to help purchase coverage on the online marketplaces, or exchanges, and the law’s Medicaid expansion. In addition to the tax on medical devices, an annual fee for health insurers is expected to raise more than $100 billion over 10 years, while a fee.
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“We Shouldn’t Be Doing It”: Lecturer Calls Out Serious Podiatric Myths

During his lecture entitled “Righting the Wrong: Exploding Myths in Podiatric Medicine” last month, Bradley W. Bakotic, DPM, DO, Bako Pathology Services in Alpharetta, GA called out some myths which have inexplicably become part of the modus operandi of the modern podiatrist. “Podiatry is a little bit incestuous,” Dr. Bakotic said. “If you go to MD school, you’re taught dermatology by a dermatologist. In podiatry, you’re often taught dermatology by a podiatrist who has an interest in dermatology. It’s incestuous in the sense that we don’t get out into other disciplines like we should. We pass on ideas, and sometimes they’re frankly wrong.” The first myth Bakotic tackled was “Soft tissue mass? Just cut it out!” school of thought. “That’s a big one” he continued, “It’s profession-wide and can actually end up in frank negligence. I think this came from the fact that 70 percent of pedal soft tissue masses are.
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Ladies! Don’t Let Bunions Give You the Blues!

APMA put out the following notes on bunions – check it out:  Bunions are among the most common type of foot ailment today’s podiatrist treats, especially in women. Studies show that women are anywhere from two to nine times more likely to develop a bunion than men! While your high heels and peep toes are partially to blame, your foot type (passed down through your family) is the true culprit. Style Squeeze Click the image above to order a FREE poster for your office. Here’s the good news! Today’s podiatrist is the true expert when it comes to diagnosing and treating bunions. Podiatrists perform tens of thousands of bunion procedures every year, more than any other medical professional in the United States. Fortunately, today’s podiatrist is only a click away! Podiatrists are uniquely qualified among medical professionals to treat bunions, based on their education, training, and experience. If you suspect.
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