We Treat Feet Podiatry Blog

Dr. Daniels Ranked In Top Podiatrists on LinkedIn

We Treat Feet’s Dr. Mike Daniels is ranked in the Top 1% of all podiatrists listed on the business social network LinkedIn! Dr. Daniels is continually ahead of the curve in connecting with both his patients and colleagues and it’s great to see him recognized. You can view his LinkedIn profile here!.
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New Year’s Resolution for Healthy Feet

If taking better care of your health is one of your New Year’s resolutions, start from the bottom up. We often don’t think of our foot health until there’s a problem with our feet. This year, promise yourself you’ll take better care of your entire body. Here are a few simple healthy foot habits to stick to in the new year. Healthy Feet Resolution #1: Walk More Walking is one of the simplest forms of exercise; it doesn’t require any special equipment, it can be done in almost any weather, and it’s good for your overall health – including your feet. Even in small 15-20 minute doses, walking will help keep your feet and your body in shape. Healthy Feet Resolution #2: Shed a Few Pounds If this isn’t already on your New Year’s resolution list, here’s one reason you should consider adding it. Less weight means less stress on.
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Winter Foot Care Tips to Keep Your Feet Healthy

Whether you’re slogging through deep snow and sub-zero temperatures in the north, or contending with dampness, chill, and muddy conditions in the south, it’s important to take care of your feet all winter long. You’ll want them to be healthy and ready for action when spring finally arrives. Most Americans will have walked 75,000 miles by the time they turn 50. Is it little wonder, then, that APMA’s 2010 foot health survey found that foot pain affects the daily activities—walking, exercising, or standing for long periods of time—of a majority of Americans? “Each season presents unique challenges to foot health,” said Matthew Garoufalis, DPM, a podiatrist and APMA president. “Surveys and research tell us that foot health is intrinsic to overall health, so protecting feet all year long is vital to our overall well-being.” APMA offers some advice for keeping feet healthy in common winter scenarios: Winter is skiing and.
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Why Wound Care for Diabetes Patients is So Important

For the 26 million Americas affected by diabetes, and the 1.9 million diagnosed annually, approximately 15 percent of those will develop foot ulcers during their lifetime, a complication that may result in amputation without timely and proper care (66,000 diabetes-related amputations are performed annually). But when it comes to wound care, especially foot ulcers, many in Contra Costa County, California managing the disease may not realize that there is dedicated center offering help. “Denial and fear are the major factors as to why those affected hesitate to get the attention they need. Wound Care Services needs to be sought out earlier in their care when we can be of most help,”said Mandy Mori, Director of Wound Care & Hyperbaric Medicine Services with John Muir Health. “Many cannot distinguish how far their wounds have progressed until it is too late.” Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above.
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Interesting Article on How DPMs are Helping to Rebuild in Haiti

Cool article about how DPMs are helping to rebuild in Haiti, from the blog of Patrick DeHeer DPM written by Fairuz Parvez DPM: When asked about my experience in Haiti, at first I did not know where to begin. If I were to sum it up in a word, it would be: shocking. It was eye opening to say the least. I was at a loss for words when I first landed in Haiti. I knew there was some structural destruction but I did not truly understand at what level, the depth of the devastation, and why it was still so. I was as guilty as the next American assuming Haiti was not so bad off. Boy, did I get a crash course in the reality of things there. The first thing that shook me to my core was just how impoverished the country really was. I have visited developing.
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No Surprise: High Heels Culprit of Most Women’s Foot Issues

The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) today announced the results of its Today’s Podiatrist survey, which measures the public’s attitudes toward foot health. The study, which surveyed 1,000 US adults ages 18 and older, revealed that nearly half of all women (49 percent) wear high heels, even though the majority of heel wearers (71 percent) complain these shoes hurt their feet. These findings seem to fit the old adage that “beauty is pain.” Even chronic discomfort doesn’t appear to deter women from purchasing the strappy stilettos they love: The average woman who owns high heels has nine pairs! Asked what they do when shoes hurt their feet, 38 percent of women said they’d “wear them anyway if I like them.” However, in spite of their extensive shoe collections, only two percent of women say they wear high heels every day, and just five percent say they wear high heels five.
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APHA ‘Get Ready Day’ Helps Americans Prep for Emergencies

The American Public Health Association (APHA) is creating awareness through their Get Ready Day campaign, which will be held on September 16, 2014. The campaign helps Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including the flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies. It’s certainly a good reminder to be aware of potentially dangerous situations and how they are safely handled. Here is a list of how to prepare for pretty much any emergency situation you can think of. This is also probably the cutest video you’ll ever see about emergency situations…Get Ready Video.
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REPORT: Office Visits by Patients With Diabetes Rising Rapidly in United States

Office visits in the United States for diabetes rose 20% from 2005 to 2010, with the largest increase in adults in their mid-20s to mid-40s, according to a new data brief from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Nearly 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, putting them at risk for other chronic conditions, such as heart disease, eye disease, and stroke, Jill J. Ashman, PhD, and colleagues from the NCHS note in the brief. On an annual basis, the cost of diabetes in the United States approaches $245 billion, and patients with diabetes have medical expenditures 2.3 times those of patients without diabetes. The researchers analyzed recent trends in office visits by patients with diabetes using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative survey of visits to nonfederal office-based physicians (excluding anesthesiologists, radiologists, and pathologists). They.
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